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Arab American Heritage Month: CUC Library Resources

Klinck Memorial Library Resources

 

 Come to the Klinck Memorial Library and check out materials from our collection or borrow through iShare!

Want to check out books on Arab American history, experience, life styles? or start with Kahlil Gibran, a Lebanese- American writer and poet who is best recognized as the author of The Prophet.
Look in our catalog.
Not sure where to locate these materials?
Come to the library!
708-209-3053
library@cuchicago.edu
 
We are here to help you!

Online Resources

Looking for more information, check out these freely available web resources to learn more about the Arab American community, its history and experiences...

100 Questions and Answers about Arab Americans
A journalist's guide to discussing and writing about Arab Americans developed by MSU School of Journalism and sponsored by the Detroit Free Press.

Arab American History and Culture (Smithsonian)
Online exhibition featuring oral histories, archival materials and other artifacts related to Arab American History from across the Smithsonian.

Arab American Foundation

An educational and cultural organization with a mission to promote the Arab heritage, educate Americans about the Arab identity, and to empower and connect Arab Americans with each other and with diverse organizations across the U.S.

Arab American Institute (AAI)
AAI represents the policy and community interests of Arab Americans and promotes Arab American participation in the U.S. electoral system.

Arab American Historical Foundation

Preserving and Disseminating Arab American History

Arab American National Museum

Arab-American Literature: Origins and Developments.  Although Arab-American literature has been in existence in the U.S. for over a century, it has only recently begun to be recognized as part of the ethnic landscape of literary America.